Murder on the battlefield

I may not be with the popular mood.  I do not approve of downgrading a killing  and releasing a killer in response to popular hysteria.

 

Murder on the battlefield

They dragged that “bastard” out of sight
From those drones overhead.
The Sarge then shot him out of spite
And left that “shite” stone dead.

The Sarge was focused on that act,
Was his soul cold with Hate?
Some say that he may well have “cracked”.
This was no hand of Fate!

Far off there in Afghanistan
Where old beliefs may rule,
This does not mean each Taliban
Is just some worthless fool.

A family has lost a son
Who fought in their own land.
Yet some excuse a killing done,
Done there quite out of hand.

But who cares here about the tears
Some Afghan Mother shed?
A killer’s freed to many cheers.
A nameless man’s long dead!

© T.Morgan 28.4.2017

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Lords and Ladies (Arum maculatum or cuckoo pint)

Lords and Ladies (Arum maculatum or cuckoo pint)

The “lords and ladies” grew deep in the shade
Then bore red berries hid quite out of sight
It did not grow within a sunlit glade
And shunned the Sun’s direct and brilliant light
For not all will partake of bold display
Nor choose to live high up above the rest
There’s safety when you hide yourself away
Through solitude it seems some may be blest
But should a mighty oak collapse and fall
A shady place may face the Sun’s full glare
Poor arums then have not the wherewithal
Existence then it is not worth a prayer
New oaks may grow and cast a cool new shade
But care not for the dead, now all decayed

 Aneirin and the Bards

I sat and wrote this in a car during a football match in a park in Worthing.  I just do not know where it came from as it just came out as fast as I can write and has needed no amendment.  Some verse arrive unannounced like that!

I guess I just like Aneirin’s poem “The Gododdin”.

 Aneirin and the Bards

Aneirin wrote an elegy
To each of his dead friends
At Catraeth through their strategy
His people’s history ends

When all of the Gododdin fell
Their names would not be lost
Aneirin in his verses tell
Of his people’s holocaust

The Angle host behind each shield
Had withstood their attack
That firm shield wall that did not yield
Each stag fell to the pack

There Ida’s line from Bamburgh Head
Established dominance
From Catraeth where the soil’s soaked red
Those Angles would advance

The lonesome bard was left to write
Gododdin’s elegy
The soul survivor of that fight
A dismal destiny

So sadly then this bard would roam
Lamenting his dead friends
And how his Briton’s home was lost
The story never ends

The Briton’s blood, the Briton’s soil
Had been merged into one
Their children would be left to toil
As slaves to those who won

But are those Angles known by name
Those men who won that fight
Without a Bard to sing their name
They have been lost from sight

The Angles had some power then
To dominate this land
Yet Bard’s words are remembered when
Old Glories turn to sand

Each elegy Aneirin wrote
Describes a long dead man
He does not rant, he does not gloat
Of chaff before a fan

For each one seems a close dear friend
And fit for sad lament
And now their fame may have no end
Bard’s words do not relent

The Poet and the Bard are here
To keep the dead alive
Defeated peoples find some cheer
Where their great deeds survive

A conquest by a stronger foe
Whose names are lost in time
Will let the future’s children know
All conquests are a crime

For Peoples and their lands are one
United, blood and place
Despite all of the wrongs been done
Defeats and past disgrace

Gododdin are still in this land
As stubbornness still shows
They’ve mingled through time’s flowing sand
As onward their line goes

At Catraeth British warriors died
The Bard has told their tale
Though widows and their orphans cried
Their blood line did not fail

The patterns in their genes are strong
Still here within this land
Despite who’s right, despite who’s wrong
There are new Bards at hand

Aneirin wrote of real things
All Bards should do the same
When of the past the singer sings
Old heroes live again

 

© Trevor Morgan 11 October 2003